Australian man experiences thunderclap headaches after eating world’s hottest pepper | barfblog

I grew up with hot peppers, love them, only thing is I can’t tolerate them. I remember going to these massive Italian weddings when I was younger and my dad used to bring his own hot dried peppers …

Source: Australian man experiences thunderclap headaches after eating world’s hottest pepper | barfblog

Viewpoint: Why the USDA decided not to over-regulate CRISPR crops—and what it means for agriculture’s future | Genetic Literacy Project

n 28 March, USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue announced that “USDA does not regulate or have any plans to regulate plants that could otherwise have been developed through traditional breeding techniques as long as they are not plant pests or developed using plant pests.” This is a big deal and a very good thing. While it

Source: Viewpoint: Why the USDA decided not to over-regulate CRISPR crops—and what it means for agriculture’s future | Genetic Literacy Project

25 years of GMO crops: Economic, environmental and human health benefits | Genetic Literacy Project

Since the first GMO crop was developed in 1994, genetically modified foods have provided countries around the world with economic, environmental and human health benefits, writes agricultural economist Stuart Smyth.

Source: 25 years of GMO crops: Economic, environmental and human health benefits | Genetic Literacy Project

Making sense of the patchwork US regulatory system for genetically engineered crops and animals | Genetic Literacy Project

he faster-growing genetically engineered AquaAdvantage Salmon took 20 years of regulatory scrutiny to gain approval, while the non-browning gene-silenced Arctic Apple took a relatively brisk 5 years. A new CRISPR-edited non-browning mushroom appears to have been cleared over a cup of coffee (okay, six months). All of

Source: Making sense of the patchwork US regulatory system for genetically engineered crops and animals | Genetic Literacy Project

From GMOs to CRISPR: Making sense of how genetic engineering tweaks nature | Genetic Literacy Project

Many new genetic engineering techniques have been stumbled upon by accident. Studying how bacteria defend themselves has led to CRISPR gene editing, which revolutionized the industry.

Source: From GMOs to CRISPR: Making sense of how genetic engineering tweaks nature | Genetic Literacy Project

First citrus trees appeared in the Himalayan foothills, scientists says – FreshFruitPortal.com

They believe that when the climate changed millions of years ago, bringing weaker monsoons and drier weather, the plants were able to spread out of the Himalayas and throughout southeast Asia.

Source: First citrus trees appeared in the Himalayan foothills, scientists says – FreshFruitPortal.com

Australia set to reduce regulations of CRISPR gene editing to speed up crop research | Genetic Literacy Project

Australia is set to reform how it regulates new genetic engineering techniques, which experts say will help to dramatically speed up health and agriculture

Source: Australia set to reduce regulations of CRISPR gene editing to speed up crop research | Genetic Literacy Project

Myth busting: Do farmers ‘drench, douse or slather’ crops in pesticides? | Genetic Literacy Project

One common belief about modern farming is that farmers use pesticides in excess on their crops. A plant scientist explains the truth.

Source: Myth busting: Do farmers ‘drench, douse or slather’ crops in pesticides? | Genetic Literacy Project